By Tom Vasel:

Tom Vasel, a well-known and well respected boardgames reviewer from South Korea, has now had a chance to test play our game. Tom has posted a detailed review of Terakh on BoardGameGeek.com.

When I first saw pictures of Terakh on the internet, I was impressed with how well it looked; but when I opened the box for the first time, I was absolutely amazed at just how superb they were…

I was really impressed by my playings of the game, and consider it a unique, fascinating design.

Fun Factor: Terakh was a lot of fun for me. I went into the game a little apprehensively, as I wasn’t sure that the magical cards and theme would work well with an abstract like board. But gameplay was fast, easy, and simply fun. Its’ fun to steal someone else’s orb and control their Idol. It’s fun to take that Idol back or use some Cast cards to get a critical hit on an enemy Elder. The game seems to take about fifteen minutes per player, which is pretty good for a war game. All who’ve I introduced the game to enjoy it, (although I think that some of them just like playing with the chunky bits.)

Tom Vasel’s Blog on gamefest.com

This game has some really nice components, and is billed by the company as a cross between Risk and Magic: the Gathering. That’s not exactly the case, but it does play as a clever small war game mixed with some special cards. While there is a decent amount of luck in the game, tactical maneuvering really helps. I went into the game a bit reluctantly, as the rules didn’t inspire me much.

But about half an hour in, I was hooked. I got massacred, but even then I was still able to affect the outcome of the game, and was just impressed all the way throughout. This is high on my “play again” list, and certainly goes on my “Sleeper hits of 2005” list. Check it out!

By Kevin Garnica:

Kevin Garnica, a boardgame reviewer from Texas, United States, has posted a review for Terakh on BoardGameGeek.com.

First Impressions Recommended, if you like downright odd games

Fun Factor I have played with the designers, seasoned gamers and my two nephews-in-law and had fun each time. The dice can really hate you sometimes, but it is good play that allows you to finish a game. Building up Idols and exploiting their various strategies and powers is fun and there is high tension when high risk/reward attacks against Idols/Elders are attempted. The most fun I have had while playing Terakh has been getting teamed up on by my nephews. It is almost as much fun trying to wear out your opponent as it is trying to go for a kill.

If you enjoy abstract tactical combat and character strategies, you will enjoy Terakh too.

By Eric Chantigny:

Eric has posted the first independent review for Terakh on BoardGameGeek.com.

“A hybrid of Risk and Magic the Gathering and semi-RPG with new twists.”

Easy to learn (15 mins) with high replay value since there are a lot of variables to the game.”

“While this game might seem quite simple, you can’t see the strategy behind it before playing it. It’s hard and you always have to check your back because those boards can turn around. You thought your elder was safe on the outside border… well now I turn the board around and you find yourself right in the middle.

Playing this game is chess-like with some randomness with cards and dice battles.

For anyone liking war games and/or strategy game, this game’s for you!”

By Matthew Weeks:

Matthew Weeks, a boardgame reviewer from Brampton, ON Canada, has posted a review for Terakh on BoardGameGeek.com.

Matthew had a chance to play this game with his friends and family members and also had a chance to play 2 games with me, Akhil. I got the chance to give him a jumpstart of the in-depth level of tactics Terakh has to offer during the first game which was a simulated 4 players game. The second game was a 1 on 1 battle. The game was very aggressive and the die rolls were not one-sided either. I had to execute many in-depth tactics maneuvering as Matt had managed to learn a chunk of the tactics Terakh.

First Impressions Frankly, I anticipated a less than desirable game play experience despite the game’s pretty pieces and after I began to grasp the tricks my suped-up Shade was capable of I wanted more. I enjoy playing Terakh with my nephews. We enjoy the tactical and strategic play.

Fun Factor I have played with the designers, seasoned gamers and my two nephews-in-law and had fun each time. The dice can really hate you sometimes, but it is good play that allows you to finish a game. Building up Idols and exploiting their various strategies and powers is fun and there is high tension when high risk/reward attacks against Idols/Elders are attempted. The most fun I have had while playing Terakh has been getting teamed up on by my nephews. It is almost as much fun trying to wear out your opponent as it is trying to go for a kill.

If you enjoy abstract tactical combat and character strategies, you will enjoy Terakh too.

Read the full review at BoardGameGeek.com

The “F” FactorIt’s fun, I’ll give it that. But it’s a wired, different sort of fun. Since the game is really something of an abstract, the theme really isn’t there, though there is a back-story to the game and its funky components. Down time is pretty short; if it’s not your turn, somebody is most likely battling you. This is a very quirky, little game. It takes a while to warm up to this game; I suspect this is one of those love-it-or-not-so-love-it type of game. While I can understand that this might not be to everyone’s liking, I think the game is just unique enough to keep it around and continue playing it.